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Arc Eye
I posted this item on a previous thread with no response so I thought I would try it again!!

How do you define weave width?
For example, if you have a 3.2mm electrode then according to conventional thinking your max. weave width is 2.5 x 3.2mm = 8mm.
If you define weave width as bead width, then you could achieve a bead width of 8mm with a 3.2mm electrode welding in the downhand position fairly easily without any weaving, which means that you cannot weave at all!
However, if you define weave width as the distance the electode moves from one side to another, is this movement measured from the centre of the electrode or from the extreme edges of the electrode? How would you actually measure this during the welding process?

Please discuss.
JLoop64
I learned in the offshore industry not to weave bigger than 2&half times the diameter of the rod your using at the time .
But ive been in shiprepair & you can weave as wide as your pc monitor if you want.
Harweld
Arc Eye,

the usual weave width is 2 to 2.5 x the electrode core diameter, not the outside diameter.
When you see a stipulation of weave width on a wps it is because the writer of the wps has calculated the maximum heat input to be permitted for the weld. Stringer beads are usually stated because there is more control over heat input.

You will also note that the voltage, current range and speed of travel are also given.

Where there is no wps to work to there is no limit to the weave width other than common sense.

Hope this helps.

Regards.

Harry
rodofgod
Hi All!

If you really go into it, this is a very 'deep' subject!
Weave width is a complex and not fully understood subject! I've asked Professors of Metallurgy to explain the reasons and although they come up with logical reasons, you can always find a get-out clause!

Anyhow to answer the original question! Weave width is x3 (unless otherwise stated) electrode diameter!

3.25mm electrode = 9.75mm ! (Try measuring that!)

With MIG and FCAW the maximum bead width is usually stated on the procedure, typically 12 or 13mm.

As Harweld states, core diameter of electrode! Not outside diameter,with flux!

Like I've said before, the reasons for limiting weave width is a complex one, involving a lot of variables to restrict un-wanted grain growth and to improve mechanical properties etc. As a welder, it's best to stick to stringer beads if there's any doubt! Your less likely to be pulled by your friendly inspector!

Regards
roddie
Difficult!
when you do a weld pqr, that is supposed to dictate what you do???
jonti
You must have insomnia Roddie sunshine.
Go to sleep.
nanjing2
Amazing!!! all these hot shot time-served welders and new generation "you've either got it or u aint" dilutees all welding day in day out and they can't agree on a simple basic issue on how they should be welding!
If max bead widths or deposited layer thickness is quoted on your WPS then you have to follow it. If its not then max. bead widths etc can be forgotten about as it will make virtually no difference to the mechanical properties of the joint welded.
Arc Eye
Thanks for your replies, but i think my original question has been missed.
For arguments sake, lets agree that max weave width is 2.5 times the core diameter. So for a 3.2mm electrode the max weave width is 8mm. How do you actually define this? Do you define it by the finished weld bead width or do you define it by the distance the electrode is moved from side to side?

This question has come up time and again with various welding inspectors and client reps so I would be interested in hearing the opinions of welding engineers or metallurgists who have some knowledge in this field.
roddie
QUOTE (jonti @ Dec 4 2005, 03:07 AM)
You must have insomnia Roddie sunshine.
Go to sleep.

Say's him at 7 minutes past 3 in the morning?? Any way, we all know the older you get, the less sleep you need. I,m getting on for 127 now!
nanjing2
Arc-eye, think about it logically, manual welding cannot control welding deposits to machining tolerances so you have to use a bit of common sense. When a weld is being welded or when it is finished the inspector can look at the passes and physically measure the widths of the beads, he can't really measure the weave width, centre line of electrode during welding. The basic idea is to give some level of confidence that heat inputs are not excessive (nobody get on their high horse about wide thin beads with good impact properties). Some specs say 2.5X or upt 4X electrode core wire diameter. Whats been done during the WPQT should be written on the WPS so everyone should be singing from the same hymn sheet. This is what I have always done and I have never had any question from a client or TPIA.
nanjing2
Arc-eye, think about it logically, manual welding cannot control welding deposits to machining tolerances so you have to use a bit of common sense. When a weld is being welded or when it is finished the inspector can look at the passes and physically measure the widths of the beads, he can't really measure the weave width, centre line of electrode during welding. The basic idea is to give some level of confidence that heat inputs are not excessive (nobody get on their high horse about wide thin beads with good impact properties). Some specs say 2.5X or upt 4X electrode core wire diameter. Whats been done during the WPQT should be written on the WPS so everyone should be singing from the same hymn sheet. This is what I have always done and I have never had any question from a client or TPIA.
nanjing2
have a nice day!
roddie
Its the actual movement of the rod from side to side, the diameter of the core wire dictates how much you can do this! Depending on what has went on with the WPQ. There is no fixed movement of the electrode except what is laid down in the WPQ! the reason for the WPQ is to guarantee to the client the the company can do the job to the specs they require.
Harweld
nanjing,

why did you make this statement-

"Amazing!!! all these hot shot time-served welders and new generation "you've either got it or u aint" dilutees all welding day in day out and they can't agree on a simple basic issue on how they should be welding"

I believe I have answered the question that was first posted.

The reason I contribute to this site is because I want to help welders who do not know the reason for doing what they do.

Harry

10062014
if one keeps the weave width to a minimum and you use the stringer technique, what happens is that you refine (normalize, through re-crystallization) the grain structure of the previous runs thus giving a more mettallurgically sound joint and at the same time fullfilling one of the criteria regarding the "WELDABILITY OF A MATERIAL". sorry lads. one too many wife beaters. now where did i leave her ?
nanjing2
QUOTE (Harweld @ Dec 5 2005, 01:47 AM)
nanjing,

why did you make this statement-

"Amazing!!! all these hot shot time-served welders and new generation "you've either got it or u aint" dilutees all welding day in day out and they can't agree on a simple basic issue on how they should be welding"

I believe I have answered the question that was first posted.

The reason I contribute to this site is because I want to help welders who do not know the reason for doing what they do.

Harry

Sorry Harry, u did!
nellesappelle

I believe weave width is the distance travelled by your electrode (side to side/horizontally/diagonally) during welding. (In mm) It seems rediculous to describe weaving in any other way.
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