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> Welding of Titanium 6mm and 12mm
excess pen
post Nov 15 2017, 09:47 AM
Joined: 29-Mar 10



Hi all,

My company has been asked to look at welding Titanium 6mm and 12mm, any hints and tips on getting WPQR's through would be greatly appreciated. We would probably go down the TIG with Argon-Helium mix route as we have heard MIG can cause LOF and excessive spatter.

Thanks in advance

Excess Pen

This post has been edited by excess pen: Nov 15 2017, 09:47 AM
Technic Al
post Nov 15 2017, 01:55 PM
Joined: 14-Oct 03



My advice would be to say "thanks but no thanks"

Its not a material you can weld from a position of no previous experience.

It could end up costing your firm a lot of money.

Thats been my advice for donkeys years and I cant remember a single example of being wrong. Ive been told of thousands of pounds worth of plate being oxidised (scrap) during attempted welding.
excess pen
post Nov 16 2017, 07:39 AM
Joined: 29-Mar 10



Thanks for the heads up Technic. The more we information we are gathering on it, it seems to be a bit non starter.

Cheers

Excess
Technic Al
post Nov 17 2017, 12:46 AM
Joined: 14-Oct 03



You have to ask....why me..........and the answer is probably because they have been quoted astronomic prices from the experienced Titanium welder.....wonder why?
ballyman
post Nov 17 2017, 10:46 AM
Joined: 12-Mar 07



Sorry for butting in guys but I'm just curious, is it difficult and why is it difficult to weld
Technic Al
post Nov 17 2017, 12:38 PM
Joined: 14-Oct 03



The main problem is that it oxidises very easily and at its worst it just crumbles. So you need to be really really careful with the heat and the shielding and it needs shielding before and after the weld. Those that do it regular have special, often self made, parts to ensure the gas coverage is complete.
rodofgod
post Nov 20 2017, 10:26 PM
Joined: 23-Feb 03



The actual welding is quite easy, it's as Al states the experience in protecting the weld and parent material from oxidation that is key. This is not really a read from a book type situation, you DO require experience at fabrication with this material.
excess pen
post Nov 21 2017, 08:32 AM
Joined: 29-Mar 10



It now seems like we ARE going to dive into the realms of Titanium, I have looked into 15614-5 and group 51, thanks all the for info, it will help us along the way of producing a WPQR. We will be going down the TIG route. Any more info hints or tips most welcome.

Thanks

Excess
phillandcap
post Nov 21 2017, 08:21 PM
Joined: 20-Jun 15



Hi Mate, titanium is a bread and butter material in aircraft engines and is easily welded. Just treat it like aluminium or stainless in regards to cleanliness. Make yourself a copper trailing box with a diffusion gauze on your torch with an argon purge and you wont go far wrong. If you have a large piece to weld you'll need a fish tank. Watch your heat input and the weld pool behaves like a mix of ali and ss
rodofgod
post Nov 21 2017, 09:16 PM
Joined: 23-Feb 03





You will need to fabricate or buy trailing gas shields and develop a sure fire purging system. Pure Argon is plenty good enough for high quality welds. Your main problems will be with:

Weld metal porosity;
Embrittlement;
Contamination cracking.

The colour of the weld and HAZ is a good indicator of the state of weld and you should be aware of these indicators and the meaning of the various weld tints.

Good luck!
excess pen
post Nov 23 2017, 11:25 AM
Joined: 29-Mar 10



Thanks all for the info, we will take all of the information on board and put it to good use.


Cheers

Excess
Technic Al
post Nov 23 2017, 11:44 AM
Joined: 14-Oct 03



You will have to let us know how you go on
Brad93
post Nov 29 2017, 10:35 PM
Joined: 28-Nov 17



I've seen some MIG welded Titanium samples. Ceramic backing was used, adapted shroud with a trailing shield. They were for the MOD.
Had to be mechanised. The setup was clunky and changes in arc length exaggerated spatter.

I would speak to huntingdon fusion techniques and possibly TWI. HFT can help with the purging/shielding side of things, TWI can help with the metallurgy and procedure side of things.
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