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> cswip or wtia
Egg packer
post Nov 8 2010, 10:17 AM
Joined: 7-Nov 05



Keel,

I sat the exam for cert 10, the closed book part but I couldn't sit the open book interpretation of the codes.
AS3992 AS4041 AS1210 ect ect ect.

Do you know where they do certification of certs 1 to 9? I've googled and can't find any info.

Cheers
Keel
post Nov 8 2010, 02:05 PM
Joined: 29-Jan 07



QUOTE (Egg packer @ Nov 8 2010, 06:17 PM) *
Keel,

I sat the exam for cert 10, the closed book part but I couldn't sit the open book interpretation of the codes.
AS3992 AS4041 AS1210 ect ect ect.

Do you know where they do certification of certs 1 to 9? I've googled and can't find any info.

Cheers

I did mine at Midland Tafe about 4 years ago. The guy in charge is from Barrow, Stuart Groves I think. If they're not running it the Thornlie Tafe probably will.

It's 2 nights a week for about 4 months, one night theory the other welding. You may get a dispensation, for the work you did at Subi Tafe, for the theory and you'll probably not need the 4 months on the welding (I did rolleyes.gif ) but it pays to go a few weeks before to get your bay set up. The test itself is timed.

I did cert 7 which is TIG 2G and a 5G. Cert 1,2 and 3 are stick I think and the other numbers are mig, fluxcore and subarc but I can't remember which numbers which.

You only need to pass 1 cert to go on for the cert 10 (supervisors).

Keel
verdi
post Nov 8 2010, 02:45 PM
Joined: 5-Nov 10



QUOTE (Keel @ Nov 8 2010, 02:05 PM) *
I did mine at Midland Tafe about 4 years ago. The guy in charge is from Barrow, Stuart Groves I think. If they're not running it the Thornlie Tafe probably will.

It's 2 nights a week for about 4 months, one night theory the other welding. You may get a dispensation, for the work you did at Subi Tafe, for the theory and you'll probably not need the 4 months on the welding (I did rolleyes.gif ) but it pays to go a few weeks before to get your bay set up. The test itself is timed.

I did cert 7 which is TIG 2G and a 5G. Cert 1,2 and 3 are stick I think and the other numbers are mig, fluxcore and subarc but I can't remember which numbers which.

You only need to pass 1 cert to go on for the cert 10 (supervisors).

Keel


"It's 2 nights a week for about 4 months"

something else missing from cswip...

my no 7 took me a year when i did it
Ballbearing
post Nov 8 2010, 11:57 PM
Joined: 9-Dec 07



Hi Keel,
Greetings from Thailand.
I sat the CSWIP 3.1 and passed without doing the course. Does that make me a chancer ? LOL !

Seriously, you are dead right about AS1796 being much more comprehensive, the theory side of welding is just as important as the practical side. Being able to pick up a handpiece and put in a beautiful weld is pointless if you do not know the damage the arc strike you left can do.
But are they just a money making exercise ? For piping a huge amount of work in Australia is being done to ASME so AS1796 is worthless other than a foot in the door to test and that can be accomplished for free with copies of old RT reports or qualification certs (if you left the previous employer on good terms)
Even AS 4041 generally requires a site weld test prior to starting welding, irrespective of prior qualifications held.
I spent 17 years as a pipe welder in Australia (Bechtel, CB&I, CBH,Transfield, United, John Holland, Santos, Monadelphous etc etc) and have been an inspector now for 13 years and I have never seen an AS 1796 certificate accepted for welding pipework - I am only talking sitework, not workshop.

Not sure I agree with the statement regarding AS 1796 acceptance criteria being more stringent than ASME IX or AS 3992.
For visual, yes ASME is very lenient but AS 1796 and AS 3992 are very similar.
For RT AS 1796 and AS 3992 both reference AS 4037 Class 1 piping as the acceptance criteria and ASME IX is more stringent than AS 4037 Class 1 piping.
Cheers,
BB
Keel
post Nov 9 2010, 09:38 AM
Joined: 29-Jan 07



QUOTE (verdi @ Nov 8 2010, 10:45 PM) *
"It's 2 nights a week for about 4 months"

something else missing from cswip...

my no 7 took me a year when i did it



I did mine in 6 months but if you take off the School holidays etc it works out about 4 months.

That's 2 nights a week. Did you you do 2 nights a week?
Keel
Keel
post Nov 9 2010, 09:46 AM
Joined: 29-Jan 07



QUOTE (Ballbearing @ Nov 9 2010, 07:57 AM) *
Hi Keel,
Greetings from Thailand.
I sat the CSWIP 3.1 and passed without doing the course. Does that make me a chancer ? LOL !

Seriously, you are dead right about AS1796 being much more comprehensive, the theory side of welding is just as important as the practical side. Being able to pick up a handpiece and put in a beautiful weld is pointless if you do not know the damage the arc strike you left can do.
But are they just a money making exercise ? For piping a huge amount of work in Australia is being done to ASME so AS1796 is worthless other than a foot in the door to test and that can be accomplished for free with copies of old RT reports or qualification certs (if you left the previous employer on good terms)
Even AS 4041 generally requires a site weld test prior to starting welding, irrespective of prior qualifications held.
I spent 17 years as a pipe welder in Australia (Bechtel, CB&I, CBH,Transfield, United, John Holland, Santos, Monadelphous etc etc) and have been an inspector now for 13 years and I have never seen an AS 1796 certificate accepted for welding pipework - I am only talking sitework, not workshop.

Not sure I agree with the statement regarding AS 1796 acceptance criteria being more stringent than ASME IX or AS 3992.
For visual, yes ASME is very lenient but AS 1796 and AS 3992 are very similar.
For RT AS 1796 and AS 3992 both reference AS 4037 Class 1 piping as the acceptance criteria and ASME IX is more stringent than AS 4037 Class 1 piping.
Cheers,
BB

I worked with a lad who did the 3.2 exam, without doing the course, and passed. He did the first morning then gave up on the lad teaching it and went home.

I can't remember the exact criteria for the 1796 but I think the visual for the cap was more stringent but the root was less so. My codes are at work so I can't check at the moment.

Your right 1796 (1 to 8) for welding is not much use except for when you want to move off the tools and onto the higher course. It covers you for AS 2214 (structural) but with us both doing the TIG (cert 7) it's not that useful

Keel
verdi
post Nov 10 2010, 10:06 AM
Joined: 5-Nov 10



"I did mine in 6 months but if you take off the School holidays etc it works out about 4 months.

That's 2 nights a week. Did you you do 2 nights a week?
Keel "

it was some time ago now - i actually cant remember - i think it was once weekly and i did mine in qld when the wtia wasnt involved at the tafe over there. it was a much easier transition than wa. i was attemptying to do the same thing in pt hedland but couldnt finish because of a move interstate but the wtia was involved here and it cost a great deal more
Keel
post Nov 11 2010, 01:27 AM
Joined: 29-Jan 07



QUOTE (verdi @ Nov 10 2010, 06:06 PM) *
"I did mine in 6 months but if you take off the School holidays etc it works out about 4 months.

That's 2 nights a week. Did you you do 2 nights a week?
Keel "

it was some time ago now - i actually cant remember - i think it was once weekly and i did mine in qld when the wtia wasnt involved at the tafe over there. it was a much easier transition than wa. i was attemptying to do the same thing in pt hedland but couldnt finish because of a move interstate but the wtia was involved here and it cost a great deal more

Hello verdi

When I was saying about the non WTIA courses not being widely recognised I was talking about WA. Is this the same in Queensland? I know Gladstone Tafe used to run the course but I think the WTIA have started doing it in the same town now.

Keel
verdi
post Nov 11 2010, 11:44 AM
Joined: 5-Nov 10



hi keel

sorry but i cant answer that, i do remember tho that many in welders in qld did possess their cert 10 but i dont know where they got them from (which tafe i mean). it was around 2000/2001 that i completed my no 7 and then on to my no 10 via correspondence at first.

i think some difficulty lies in as3834 certification. i do believe that there are vested (and conflicting) interests in the welding world and certification. as 3834.5 in turn references the iso 17000 series.

3834 references the wtia extensively to its detriment i believe; other institutions whether accredited by the aust govt or not seem to be left out.

just my thoughts....

inspector uk oz
post Dec 25 2010, 03:51 AM
Joined: 23-Dec 10



Hello.

Ive worked in Oz for four years as a welding supervisor, welding coordinator and manager.

To sum up on the cswip wtia/iiw I will say this.

I have boiler maker trade,IIW, HNC weld fab, cAS1796 ert 10, pcn, ndt certs , aicip inservice inspector ect and work for a large inspection company as a manager that employes 3rd party qaqc inpectors and welding supervisors and myself and my fellow managers including hr always prefer IIW and AS1796 cert 10 inspectors over cswip for these reasons:

1.I have found that some guys with cswip hold no trade background or tafe/college certs so lack basic welding knowledge because there are no pre recs to do the course compared with WTIA IIW.
2.there is only 40 hours training with cswip level 3.1 compared to 190 for AS1796 through tafe/college as part of a cert4 advanced trade cert and 220 + hours for the IIW IWS diploma through the WTIA.
Also the IIW IWIS inspector through wtia is post IWS...

Some companies in Oz are asking for cwsip but mainly in the west were skills are in shortage and TWI have courses running there.
Also alot of inspector jobs require supervision, pqr/wps development, process and consumable set up and a non skilled inspector with just cswip 3.1 generally has not been taught this in 40 hours.

It is different to the UK as welding engineers are rare here and inspectors get paid the engineer rate but are expected to carry out those duties.

I believe CSWIP is great as long as someone has other welding qualifications.
mick
post Dec 26 2010, 10:54 AM
Joined: 25-Jan 04



Hi Lads,

The CSWIP 3.1 qual is for Welding Inspection, if you are going to compare, it can only be used to compare with the Australian WTIA Welding Inspection course, which itself is a week long course.

IWS or EWS is a qualification for supervisory roles not a Welding Inspection Qualification!

Australia is a bit different from the UK where the welding inspector basically carries out various roles such as engineering, supervision and also QA! However you cannot expect a CSWIP 3.1 or even an IWS (basic level) to carry out welding engineer duties!


Cheers,
Mick
verdi
post Jan 4 2011, 10:55 PM
Joined: 5-Nov 10



definitely agree with you inspector

i hold cert 10 and an apprenticeship yet some of the bozos i come across who only hold cswip amaze me. its like the anecdote of pastry cooks getting their welding ticket.

im currently employed as an inspector and some who hold the cswip have absolutely no welding background at all or maybe a metalurgy qualifiaction which enables him to get the cswip. this goes for the wtia as well. i know others who hold the inspector ticket from them, who dont have a detailed welding background. how do these people get their tickets?

it angers me that this qualification is preferred over the cert 10. i rang the wtia some time ago and asked if my cert 10 could be used as prior knowledge and it was refused. how can these people have confidence?
3.2 Inspector
post Jan 6 2011, 03:17 AM
Joined: 4-Nov 09



Lets face it, holding a CSWIP 3.1 or even 3.2 means 0 in some cases.
I have worked with some CSWIP inspectors, which were absolute retards in regards to welding and NDT....

3.2

Heck, even I hold several CSWIP certificates.
mick
post Jan 6 2011, 06:07 AM
Joined: 25-Jan 04



Whether you have WTIA or CSWIP itís all down to experience, which takes years working in different environments and if you remember we all have to start somewhere. I hope all the experienced guys who come across someone a bit green would help them out!

Cheers,
Mick
Ballbearing
post Jan 6 2011, 11:13 AM
Joined: 9-Dec 07



Guys,
I spent 10 years working full time in Australia / New Zealand and Papua New Guinea with only CBIP NZ welding inspector qualifications (that are not recognised anywhere else in the world)
Did the CSWIP 3.1 (without attending the course and passed) so I could apply for overseas work.
Did it make me a better inspector - no. But it opened doors and I have been having a ball working in Thailand for the last 16 months.
As 3.2 has said the ticket or tickets someone holds means nothing, the ability to perform the job competently is all that matters,
Cheers,
BB
Steph
post Feb 25 2020, 09:21 AM
Joined: 25-Feb 20



Hi all
I realise that this is an old post but I have the same question except that we are now fast forward 10 years.
Just as a general background I have completed a certificate 3 and a diploma in engineering, have work for 5 years as a structural fabricator/ welder. I have been working as a QC for the last year and a half and will like to go for the inspector course. Unfortunately I do not qualify to enrol for the cswip 3.1, so I will have to do the 3.0 visual inspector or the international welding inspector basic from wtia. I am finding hard to chose which one to go for as I do not know which one is more relevant/accepted within Australian and multinational companies? Any help is much appreciated

Cheers
Steph from Melbourne Australia
Rustyplater
post Feb 27 2020, 01:35 PM
Joined: 25-Feb 11



I would have thought that a CSWIP would be your better option, as it is recognised worldwide.
bonmar
post Mar 12 2020, 01:42 PM
Joined: 2-Sep 04



CSWIP would be the better option, WTIA is only recognised or accepted in Australia. CSWIP has been around longer and accepted world wide.
WTIA will not certify you unless you have the required experience, you will receive the IWI (b) qualification equivalent to CSWIP 3.1, however this will be a diploma not certification.
When you have the required experience you will be eligible to apply for certification.
Most, if not all client specifictions ask for certified inspection personnel..

CSWIP 3.0 is worthless in Australia however , after holding this qualification for two years you automatically qualify to do CSWIP 3.1
Most NDT technicians take this route ...

IWI (B) is not certification , it is a diploma and certification can be applied for you have the required experience (WTIA certified welding inspector)

This post has been edited by bonmar: Mar 12 2020, 01:44 PM
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